Business Administration

The objective of the business administration program is to provide graduates with the skills necessary for successful careers in business. To this end, several major concentrations are available, all of which are built on a traditional liberal arts foundation. Students may explore interests in business management and accounting. These concentrations are designed to provide not only a strong business background, but also basic foundational skills. In combination with the liberal arts core, the major provides students with the opportunity to develop communication and teamwork skills. Graduates should also be prepared to be effective problem solvers, ready to face the challenges of an ever-changing business environment.

An important part of the major for many students is the opportunity to apply what they have learned through an internship experience. As a part of the major, students work in organizations and earn credit for the experience. The internship requirement provides students with valuable, real-world, practical experiences that are helpful in finding and performing well in later employment. Another hands-on learning opportunity is available through an investment course in which the students determine how to invest $100,000 of the Anderson Special Endowment.

Learning Outcomes

Management Concentration
Students who graduate with a concentration in management will be able to:

  1. Employ knowledge and skills associated with accounting, economics, marketing, management, and finance to make effective organizational decisions;
  2. Integrate the above fields in problem analysis and the development of organizational strategy;
  3. Assess the performance impact of organizational decisions;
  4. Apply the knowledge, skills, and dispositions derived from the core curriculum to organizational settings.
Managerial Accounting Concentration
Students who graduate with a concentration in managerial accounting will be able to:

  1. Provide relevant information to support organizational decisions;
  2. Prepare financial statements and other decision-support documents;
  3. Employ accounting information systems for both financial reporting and internal decision making;
  4. Distinguish among the informational needs of internal decision-makers and financial statement users;
  5. Integrate the fields of accounting, economics, finance, and management in problem analysis and the development of organizational strategy;
  6. Assess the impact of organizational decisions;
  7. Apply the knowledge, skills, and dispositions derived from the core curriculum to organizational settings.
Small Business Management Concentration
Students who graduate with a concentration in small business management will be able to:

  1. Employ knowledge and skills associated with accounting, economics, marketing, management, and finance to make effective organizational decisions;
  2. Integrate the above fields in problem analysis and the development of organizational strategy;
  3. Assess the performance impact of organizational decisions;
  4. Integrate disciplines to effectively plan, develop strategies, and implement controls that are necessary in the entrepreneurial process;
  5. Develop business ideas or initiatives and take the necessary steps to bring the idea into fruition;
  6. Apply the knowledge, skills, and dispositions derived from the core curriculum to organizational settings.

Management Concentration

A minimum of 45 semester hours is required, including:
ACC 210: Foundations of Accounting
ACC 309: Managerial Accounting
BSA 101: Introduction to Business
BSA 303: Principles of Management
BSA 304: Principles of Marketing
BSA 311: Principles of Finance
BSA 401: Production and Operations Management
BSA 421: Strategic Management
BSA 450: Internship
ECO 205: Principles of Economics
ENG 325: Professional Writing
MAT 210: Probability and Statistics

Nine semester hours of upper-division electives in BSA, ACC, ECO, at least three of which must be business, are required.

Managerial Accounting Concentration

A minimum of 45 semester hours is required, including:
ACC 210: Foundations of Accounting
ACC 309: Managerial Accounting
ACC 324: Taxation for Managers
ACC 351: Financial Reporting I
ACC 352: Financial Reporting II
BSA 101: Introduction to Business
BSA 303: Principles of Management
BSA 304: Principles of Marketing
BSA 311: Principles of Finance
BSA 320: Management Information Systems
BSA 401: Production and Operations Management
BSA 450: Internship
ECO 205: Principles of Economics
ENG 325: Professional Writing
MAT 210: Probability and Statistics

Small Business Management Concentration

A minimum of 45 semester hours is required, including:
ACC 210: Foundations of Accounting
ACC 309: Managerial Accounting
BSA 101: Introduction to Business
BSA 303: Principles of Management
BSA 304: Principles of Marketing
BSA 311: Principles of Finance
BSA 361: Retailing
BSA 401: Production and Operations Management
BSA 418: Entrepreneurship I
BSA 425: Small Business Operations
BSA 450: Internship
ECO 205: Principles of Economics
ENG 325: Professional Writing
MAT 210: Probability and Statistics

One of the following:
ACC 324: Taxation for Managers
BSA 362: Professional Sales
BSA 419: Entrepreneurship II: The Entrepreneurship Experience

Minor in Management

A minimum of 18 semester hours is required, including:
ACC 210: Foundations of Accounting
BSA 101: Introduction to Business
BSA 303: Principles of Management
ECO 205: Principles of Economics
MAT 210: Probability and Statistics
Three credits of upper-division BSA or ECO electives are required.

Minor in Accounting

A minimum of 18 semester hours is required, including:
ACC 210: Foundations of Accounting
ACC 309: Managerial Accounting
ACC 324: Taxation for Managers
ACC 351: Financial Reporting I
ACC 352: Financial Reporting II
BSA 101: Introduction to Business

Minor in Economics

A minimum of 18 semester hours is required, including:
ECO 205: Principles of Economics
ECO 345: Intermediate Microeconomics
ECO 346: Intermediate Macroeconomics
Nine credits in ECO electives are required.

ACC 210 - Foundations of Accounting
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course is designed to give students a basic understanding of the uses and limitations of accounting information, particularly from financial statements. Students will understand how to take information from the financial statements and make informed business decisions.
Prerequisite: BSA 101
ACC 299 - Independent Study
Semester: On Demand
Semester hours: 1-3
This course allows a superior student to devise and pursue independent study in an area agreed upon in consultation with, and supervised by, a faculty member. Students should be either a major or minor and have a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or greater.
ACC 309 - Managerial Accounting
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3
Students examine how managers use accounting information and how that information should be gathered and provided. Topics include the measurement and use of cost information, cost control, budgeting, performance appraisal, and decision-making using accounting information.
Prerequisite: ACC 210, ECO 205
ACC 324 - Taxation for Managers
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course provides an analysis of the effects of tax law upon business transactions and related decision-making. Emphasis is placed on tax planning and tax minimization strategies.
Prerequisite: BSA 311, ACC 309
ACC 351 - Financial Reporting I
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3
A course that covers proper income statement and balance sheet presentation in accordance with current professional pronouncements. Other topics included are current value concepts, inventory, cash and receivables, plant assets, and intangible assets.
Prerequisite: ACC 210, ECO 205
ACC 352 - Financial Reporting II
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course, a continuation of BSA 351, considers proper accounting for current and long-term liabilities, investments, pensions, and leases. Various aspects of stockholders' equity and the analysis of financial statements are also included.
Prerequisite: ACC 210, ECO 205
ACC 499 - Independent Study
Semester: On Demand
Semester hours: 1-3
This course allows a superior student to devise and pursue independent study in an area agreed upon in consultation with, and supervised by, a faculty member. Students should be either a major or minor and have a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or greater.
Prerequisite: junior or senior standing
BSA 101 - Introduction to Business
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3
A beginning business course designed to introduce students to the areas of business study, including historical foundations of America's free enterprise system, ethics and social responsibility in the business setting, entrepreneurship, the legal structures of business, marketing, and general management.
BSA 291 - Field Practicum
Semester: On Demand
Semester hours: 1-3
This course provides practical experience in an organization for students interested in exploring career opportunities. The course does not satisfy the experiential learning requirement, nor does it count toward the major.
Prerequisite: permission of professor
BSA 299 - Independent Study
Semester: On Demand
Semester hours: 1-3
This course allows a superior student to devise and pursue independent study in an area agreed upon in consultation with, and supervised by, a faculty member. Students should be either a major or minor and have a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or greater.
BSA 303 - Principles of Management
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3
Students examine the management functions and basic concepts and principles of management, including planning, organization, coordination, control, job design, and human resource management. Topics in human resource management include recruitment, selection, administration of personnel policies, and dismissals. This course is often required as a prerequisite for master’s-level business programs.
Prerequisite: ACC 210, ECO 205
BSA 304 - Principles of Marketing
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course studies the marketing process from product development through consumer purchase. The course includes examination of consumer buying behavior, marketing channels, physical distribution, pricing policies, and promotion along with their role in the marketing process.
Prerequisite: ECO 205
BSA 311 - Principles of Finance
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3
Students are introduced to the principles of business finance. Topics covered include financial analysis and planning, working capital management, the time value of money, and capital budgeting.
Prerequisite: ACC 210, ECO 205
BSA 313 - Enactus: Entrepreneurship in Action
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 2
Students will develop skills in leadership, communication, and teamwork through learning and practicing the principles of free enterprise. Students select, plan, and implement real-world projects and compete annually at the national Enactus competition. This course can be taken a maximum of four times, but only four credits may count toward the major.
Prerequisite: BSA 101 or ECO 205
BSA 320 - Management Information Systems
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
Students study information technology and its relationship to the business world. This course is designed to provide business students with general insights into information technology beyond the introductory level. This course is often required as a prerequisite for master's level business programs.
Prerequisite: BSA 303
BSA 331 - Business Law
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3
A course that explores the legal principles relating to business transactions: contracts, sales, commercial paper, intellectual property, and e-commerce. A study of the legal environment of business is emphasized. This course is often required as a prerequisite for master's level business programs.
Prerequisite: ACC 210, ECO 205
BSA 336 - Human Resource Management
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
Introduction to the human resource functions of workforce planning, legal requirements, work design, recruiting, selection, training and development, performance management, labor, and employee relations.
Prerequisite: BSA 303
BSA 347 - Principles of Investing
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course explores those financial institutions that serve our free market society. Along the way, students will learn about common stocks and bonds and how to analyze those instruments. Students will be exposed to "contrary thinking" and will be encouraged to think for themselves. All of these issues will be interwoven with logical lessons about life and the pursuit of high ethical standards.
Prerequisite: BSA 311
BSA 356 - Economic Decision Making
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course provides an introduction to the principles of sound economic and financial decision-making both for organizations and for individuals. Students also become familiar with the foundational principles of management, planning, and performance assessment. This course does not count toward a major or minor in business management or accounting.
BSA 361 - Retailing
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3
This course focuses on the study of retail institutions, basic principles of retail merchandising, buying and selling products, the importance of store location and layout, and the principles of store and personnel management.
Prerequisite: BSA 304
BSA 362 - Professional Sales
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3
This course teaches the basic concepts required to become successful in the field of sales, focusing primarily on business-to-business selling. It includes such topics as understanding the sales cycle, how to make successful sales presentations, understanding the importance of relationships in the sales process, handling objections, and how to close.
Prerequisite: BSA 304
BSA 401 - Production and Operations Management
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3
An introduction to various aspects of production, resource, and operations management, which focuses on production methodologies, scheduling, inventory control, quality control, and project management. Performance evaluation and resource planning are also emphasized. This course is often required as a prerequisite for master's-level business programs.
Prerequisite: ACC 309, BSA 303
BSA 412 - Business Ethics
Semester: Fall; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3
A study of the ethical problems that evolve in the modern business world, including a brief history of ethics and the practical ethical problems associated with running a business. Knowledge of ethical concepts as they apply to business management is explored through case studies and student class presentations. Emphasis is on the role of management as it affects stockholders, employees, customers, and competitors. Issues such as product safety, plant closures, advertising, doing business in other countries, and the overall role of business and society are discussed.
Prerequisite: BSA 401
BSA 418 - Entrepreneurship I
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3
Students will learn the characteristics of successful entrepreneurs, how to seek and evaluate opportunities for new ventures, how to prepare a complete business plan, and how to plan strategies and gather resources to create business opportunities.
Prerequisite: BSA 401
BSA 419 - Entrepreneurship II: The Entrepreneurial Experience
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
Students will engage in a variety of related activities that help validate the marketability of their ideas. These will include further product/service development, prototyping, test marketing, small scale manufacturing, and contingency planning. Students will take actions that further prove the viability of the product or service and move the aspiring entrepreneur several steps closer to actual start-up. Students will be required to pay a fee that serves as seed money or initial start-up capital to pursue ways or means to bring the entrepreneurial venture into existence or reality.
Prerequisite: BSA 361, BSA 418
BSA 421 - Strategic Management
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
The primary goal of this course is to prepare students to think like general managers. Through discussions, supplementary readings, and case studies, we will explore the strategies that cause some businesses to fail and others to succeed. This course provides a capstone experience for the business management major.
Prerequisite: BSA 401
BSA 425 - Small Business Operations
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course focuses on how owners and managers grow companies in a professional manner while maintaining the entrepreneurial spirit. Students draw from varied disciplines to create and understand strategies for building and growing a successful venture.
Prerequisite: BSA 418
BSA 450 - Internship
Semester: On Demand
Semester hours: 1-12
Guided work experience and study of a professional nature in an established business, government agency, or other institution. Contract is required. A minimum of three semester hours is required, but no more than three semester hours will count toward the major. Pass/no pass grading.
Prerequisite: BSA 401
BSA 455 - Topics in Leadership
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 1
This course is designed to expose students to a variety of leadership styles and traits through the use of guest speakers. Students will have the opportunity to gain insight into various careers: insight that goes beyond typical classroom exploration. Furthermore, students will have the opportunity to practice critical-analysis skills through a variety of case studies.
Prerequisite: BSA 303
BSA 490 - Seminar
Semester: On Demand
Semester hours: 1-3
Selected topics in business are explored.
BSA 499 - Independent Study
Semester: On Demand
Semester hours: 1-3
This course allows a superior student to devise and pursue independent study in an area agreed upon in consultation with, and supervised by, a faculty member. Students should be either a major or minor and have a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or greater.
Prerequisite: junior or senior standing
ECO 205 - Principles of Economics
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course will introduce the principles of firm-level decision making, consumer choices and their rationale, differing forms of industry competition, and how market-clearing prices and quantities are determined in a market environment. Additionally, the students will gain an understanding of how the major participants in the economy interact and what drives economic growth, interest rates, and inflation. The possible impacts of a variety of fiscal and monetary policy choices will be presented to assist the student in understanding how those policies will impact incomes, employment, and trade for a country. At the completion of the course, the student should have a basic understanding of both the microeconomic and macroeconomic environments and their impacts on businesses and the general population.
ECO 299 - Independent Study
Semester: On Demand
Semester hours: 1-3
This course allows a superior student to devise and pursue independent study in an area agreed upon in consultation with, and supervised by, a faculty member. Students should be either a major or minor and have a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or greater.
ECO 301 - Money and Banking
Semester: Spring; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3
This course provides a critical analysis of the theoretical and practical operations of modern financial intermediaries and their relation to the Federal Reserve Bank and international money markets.
Prerequisite: ECO 205
ECO 305 - American Economic History
Semester: On Demand
Semester hours: 3
Students explore a history of the American economy from colonial to modern times with emphasis on industrial growth, government policy, and agriculture.
Prerequisite: ECO 205
ECO 345 - Intermediate Microeconomics
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
Students explore a theoretical study of industry, business, and household decision-making in the context of perfect and imperfect competition. The theory of production, exchange, and distribution under static and dynamic conditions will be examined.
Prerequisite: ECO 205
ECO 346 - Intermediate Macroeconomics
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3
This course examines an analysis of Keynesian and post-Keynesian economic theories of national income, employment, and growth.
Prerequisite: ECO 205
ECO 354 - Environmental Economics
Semester: Spring; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3
Students examine the application of microeconomics to problems of the environment. This course is offered both for the major and for those interested in environmental problems.
Prerequisite: ECO 205
ECO 401 - International Trade
Semester: Spring; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3
This course explores the structure of world trade, the effect of international trade upon national income, exchange rates, problems of foreign aid and investment, and industrialization of underdeveloped countries.
Prerequisite: ECO 345
ECO 402 - Development of Economic Ideas
Semester: Fall; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3
This course explores historic development of economic theory. Emphasis is analytical; consideration is given to institutional and philosophical backgrounds.
Prerequisite: ECO 345, ECO 346
ECO 450 - Internship
Semester: On Demand
Semester hours: 1-12
This course is a guided work experience in an already established place of business. The student must arrange the internship in agreement with the instructor and the Office of Career Services. The internship should relate to the student's major or minor area of study. Contract is required.
Prerequisite: junior or senior standing
ECO 490 - Seminar
Semester: On Demand
Semester hours: 1-3
Selected topics in economics are explored.
ECO 499 - Independent Study
Semester: On Demand
Semester hours: 1-3
This course allows a superior student to devise and pursue independent study in an area agreed upon in consultation with, and supervised by, a faculty member. Students should be either a major or minor and have a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or greater.
Prerequisite: junior or senior standing
ENG 325 - Professional Writing
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3
This course teaches concepts, practices, and skills for communicating technical, scientific, or business-related information. Topics include understanding how people read, designing documents, incorporating graphics, writing about statistical results, rewriting, editing, and using the Internet. This course may be especially useful for non-English majors, providing them with the tools and techniques to communicate their messages effectively.
Prerequisite: ENG 119
MAT 210 - Probability and Statistics
Semester: Fall, Spring, and Summer
Semester hours: 3
This course provides a non-calculus-based study of discrete probability theory and its statistical applications. Distribution theory and its applications in hypothesis testing and setting confidence intervals are discussed.
Prerequisite: MAT 100 or satisfactory score on a placement exam
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