FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts

RMC Media Team, 406.657.1105, media@rocky.edu 

Photo caption: On a handheld wireless controller, a pilot of an Easy Star II sees an instantaneous cockpit view even when the aircraft is out of sight.

UAS System Unmanned aerial systems buzz RMC aviation program 

BILLINGS, May 5, 2014 – An unmanned aerial systems (UAS) – drone – curriculum is flying high at the Rocky Mountain College aviation program, where Professor Scott Wilson’s students flew six drone vehicles this spring while studying legal and physical ramifications of drone use. Wilson’s spring class on drones has built on concurrent legal issues and technological advances of UAS.  

On Monday, May 12, at 12:00 p.m., Wilson and students Joseph Mutchler and Ryan Rogeski offer media a presentation of recent program advances, demonstrate new equipment, and discuss legal ramifications of UAS use. 

Wilson has more than 1,000 hours of flight instruction and 10,000 hours of ground instruction. He is also an aviation attorney who has served as vice president of a cargo airline and fixed base operator and currently is the regional legal counsel for the Airline Owners and Pilots Association. He has litigated FAA enforcement cases and negotiated international aviation contracts in Europe and Asia. Professor Wilson has also served as Special Assistant U.S. Attorney and Assistant Attorney General for Montana as well as chairman of the Billings Police Commission. He has flown for the Navy, U.S. Forest Service, various FBOs, and commercial operators. He retired as a Captain in the U.S. Navy after serving several years with NATO forces overseas, where he worked closely with foreign military officers including in supervision of Long Range Planning (J35) for all air operations in Saudi Arabia.  

Mutchler, a sophomore from Billings, flew 13 years in the armed forces on missions over Afghanistan and many Middle Eastern nations such as Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and Oman. He was a flight officer in charge of avionics such as autopilot, navigation, and communication systems.

Rogeski (’14) reports June 29 to Naval Officer Training School in Rhode Island to become a U.S. Navy fighter pilot. From Nine Mile Falls, Wash., he graduated from RMC last week with private pilot, instrument rating, commercial, and multi-engine certifications. 

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