English

Course Catalog: English

The English program offers major concentrations in literary studies and creative writing along with a major in English education. Students who focus on literary studies will immerse themselves in principal works of the Western and non-Western traditions. Whether analyzing themes, characters, styles, or synthesizing ideas, students develop the analytical and communication skills that are exceptional preparation for rich and rewarding personal and professional lives. Students who pursue creative writing will discover and refine their own voices in poetry, fiction, and playwriting. Studying both literature and the complex craft of writing, they learn to view texts as a bridge to self-discovery and creative engagement with the world and its rich literary traditions. English education students take extensive coursework in English and education curricula to prepare them for careers as middle school and/or high school English teachers. We are pleased to say that our English education program has an excellent record of placing students in teaching jobs.

Learning Outcomes

Literary Studies
Students who graduate with a concentration in literary studies will:

  1. Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the major authors and movements of British and American literature;
  2. Interpret literary texts, employing appropriate techniques and terms of literary analysis;
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of multiple theoretical perspectives of literary analysis, including feminist, formalist, psychoanalytic, and historicist perspectives; and
  4. Demonstrate well-developed skills in reading closely, thinking critically, and communicating effectively in writing.

Creative Writing
Students who graduate with a concentration in creative writing will:

  1. Demonstrate mastery of the conventions of fiction, creative nonfiction, or poetry;
  2. Demonstrate mastery of effective writing and editing processes for contemporary fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry;
  3. Demonstrate the professional habits of active creative writers: give public readings, read literary magazines, and submit work for publication according to professional standards of manuscript preparation;
  4. Demonstrate a thorough knowledge of important figures, movements, and genres of contemporary and historical literature; and
  5. Demonstrate a command of grammar and conventions of Standard Written English.

English Education
Students who graduate with a concentration in English education will:

Literary Studies Concentration

A minimum of 33 semester hours is required, including:
ENG 252: Close Reading of Poetry
ENG 331: Literary Criticism
ENG 359: History and Grammar of English
ENG 471: Studies in Shakespeare
ENG 490: Literary Studies Capstone

Choose one of the following courses:
ENG 272: British Literature: 800 to 1800
ENG 273: British Literature: 1800 to Present

Choose one of the following courses:
ENG 282: American Literature: Origins to 1865
ENG 283: American Literature: 1865 to Present

Choose two of the following courses:
ENG 204: Introductory Poetry Writing
ENG 205: Introductory Creative Nonfiction Writing
ENG 206: Introductory Fiction Writing
ENG 325: Professional Writing
ENG 365: Journalism

Choose one of the following courses:
ENG 223: Introduction to Native American Literature
ENG 224: Introduction to African-American Literature
ENG 291: Contemporary World Fiction

Also required: three additional credits in 300-level English or higher.

Creative Writing Concentration

A minimum of 36 semester hours is required, including:
ENG 122: Introduction to Creative Writing
ENG 482: Creative Writing Capstone
ENG 491: Literary Journal I
ENG 493: Literary Journal II

Choose two of the following:
ENG 204: Introductory Poetry Writing
ENG 205: Introductory Creative Nonfiction Writing
ENG 206: Introductory Fiction Writing

Choose one of the following: (offered on a two-year rotation)
ENG 374: Advanced Poetry Writing
ENG 375: Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing
ENG 376: Advanced Fiction Writing

Choose one of the following:
ENG 325: Professional Writing
ENG 365: Journalism

Choose one of the following: (offered on a three-year rotation)
ENG 343: Readings in Contemporary Poetry
ENG 345: Readings in Contemporary Creative Nonfiction
ENG 346: Readings in Contemporary Fiction

Choose one of the following:
ENG 272: British Literature: 800 to 1800
ENG 273: British Literature: 1800 to Present
ENG 471: Studies in Shakespeare

Choose one of the following:
ENG 282: American Literature: Origins to 1865
ENG 283: American Literature: 1865 to Present
ENG 445: The American Novel
ENG 447: The American Short Story
ENG 452: American Poetry in the 20th Century

Choose one of the following:
ENG 223: Introduction to Native American Literature
ENG 224: Introduction to African-American Literature
ENG 291: Contemporary World Literature

Major in English Education

A minimum of 36 semester hours is required, including:
ENG 252: Close Reading of Poetry
ENG 328: Digital and Media Literacy
ENG 331: Literary Criticism
ENG 359: History and Grammar of English
ENG 420: Methods and Materials: Teaching English in the Secondary School
ENG 471: Studies in Shakespeare

Choose one of the following courses:
ENG 272: British Literature: 800 to 1800
ENG 273: British Literature: 1800 to Present

Choose one of the following courses:
ENG 282: American Literature: Origins to 1865
ENG 283: American Literature: 1865 to Present

Choose two of the following courses:
ENG 204: Introductory Poetry Writing
ENG 205: Introductory Creative Nonfiction Writing
ENG 206: Introductory Fiction Writing
ENG 325: Professional Writing
ENG 365: Journalism

Choose one of the following courses:
ENG 223: Introduction to Native American Literature
ENG 224: Introduction to African American Literature
ENG 291: Contemporary World Fiction

Also required: three additional credits in 300-level English or higher.

In addition, students must complete all of the requirements of the professional education program for secondary teaching (grades 5-12) as described in the "Education" section of the catalog.

Minor in Literary Studies

A minimum of 18 semester hours is required, including:
ENG 252: Close Reading of Poetry
ENG 331: Literary Criticism

Choose one of the following:
ENG 272: British Literature: 800 to 1800
ENG 273: British Literature: 1800 to Present

Choose one of the following:
ENG 282: American Literature: Origins to 1865
ENG 283: American Literature: 1865 to Present

Also required: six additional credits in 300-level literature or higher.

Minor in Writing

A minimum of 18 semester hours is required, including:
ENG 122: Introduction to Creative Writing
ENG 205: Introductory Creative Nonfiction Writing
ENG 325: Professional Writing
ENG 365: Journalism
ENG 482: Creative Writing Capstone

Choose one of the following:
ENG 204: Introductory Poetry Writing
ENG 206: Introductory Fiction Writing

Minor in English Education

A minimum of 27 semester hours is required, including:
ENG 205: Introductory Creative Nonfiction Writing
ENG 252: Close Reading of Poetry
ENG 331: Literary Criticism
ENG 338: Literature, Film, and Media
ENG 420: Methods and Materials: Teaching English in the Secondary School
ENG 471: Studies in Shakespeare

Choose one of the following:
ENG 223: Introduction to Native American Literature
ENG 224: Introduction to African-American Literature
ENG 291: Contemporary World Fiction

Choose one of the following:
ENG 272: British Literature: 800 to 1800
ENG 273: British Literature: 1800 to Present

Choose one of the following:
ENG 282: American Literature: Origins to 1865
ENG 283: American Literature: 1865 to Present

In addition, students must complete all of the requirements of the professional education program for secondary teaching (grades 5-12) as described in the "Education" section of the catalog.

  1. Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the major authors and movements of British and American literature;
  2. Interpret literary texts, employing appropriate techniques and terms of literary analysis;
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of multiple theoretical perspectives of literary analysis, including feminist, formalist, psychoanalytic, and historicist perspectives; and
  4. Demonstrate well-developed skills in reading closely, thinking critically, and communicating effectively in writing.

ENG 090 - Support ESL I

Semester: Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 3

These credits will count for the semester in which the course is taken but will not be counted toward the 120 credits needed for graduation. Students for whom English is a second language may request this course or may be required to take this course, which will help build intermediate academic English skills. The course will be customized to meet the needs of a particular student or group of students.


ENG 091 - Support ESL II

Semester: Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 3

These credits will count for the semester in which the course is taken but will not be counted toward the 120 credits needed for graduation. Students for whom English is a second language may request this course or may be required to take this course, which will help build intermediate academic English skills. The course will be customized to meet the needs of a particular student or group of students.


ENG 103 - Advanced ESL I

Semester: Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 3

These credits will count for the semester in which it is taken but will not be counted toward the 120 credits needed for graduation. This advanced-level course is offered to students for whom English is a second language and who wish to refine their English language skills. The course will be customized to meet the needs of a particular student or group of students.


ENG 104 - Advanced ESL II

Semester: Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 3

These credits will count for the semester in which the course is taken but will not be counted toward the 120 credits needed for graduation. This advanced-level course is offered to students for whom English is a second language and who wish to refine their English language skills. The course will be customized to meet the needs of a particular student or group of students.


ENG 118 - Basic Composition

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

This course introduces students to the basic skills necessary for writing effectively at the college level and prepares students for the writing demands of other college courses. Students explore many types of writing projects, beginning with a personal essay and ending with a formal critique. Using writing theory, the course emphasizes writing as a process, the importance of revising, and the value of peer editing and evaluating. This course may not be taken to satisfy core curriculum requirements.


ENG 119 - First-Year Writing Seminar

Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3

This course is an introduction to college writing. Students critically read and discuss texts, learn that writing is a process, experiment with academic prose, develop the skills necessary to create and support a thesis, practice incorporating research into their analysis, and develop grammatical and stylistic competence. Students keep a portfolio of their work, which includes a self-evaluation of their writing progress. This course fulfills a core curriculum requirement. It cannot be used to fulfill any major or minor requirement.


ENG 120 - Critical Reading and Evaluative Writing

Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3

Designed to follow ENG 119, students analyze texts and create effective writing based on their insights. Students practice generating questions that lead to the formation of complex theses and effective support. Building on the idea of integrated knowledge, students develop strategies aiding them in cross-disciplinary and multi-cultural reasoning. They compose essays deploying diverse strategies, such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast, analysis, and argumentation. Students keep a portfolio of their work, which includes a self-evaluation of their writing progress. This course fulfills a core curriculum requirement. It cannot be used to fulfill any major or minor requirement.

Prerequisite: ENG 119


ENG 122 - Introduction to Creative Writing

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

This workshop course introduces students to the writing of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. We will discuss a range of fundamentals, including image, voice, character, form, conflict, and metaphor. Utilizing all stages of the writing process—invention, drafting, revision, and editing—students will produce original in work in each of the three genres. Students will also become familiar with the process of workshopping their peers’ writing.


ENG 204 - Introductory Poetry Writing

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3

This workshop course introduces students to formal and free verse and focuses on the basic elements of poetry writing, including image, sound, rhythm, line break, and metaphor. Students will read the work of accomplished authors, complete numerous and varied writing exercises, read and critique the work of their peers, and weekly write and revise poems.

Prerequisite: ENG 119


ENG 205 - Introductory Creative Nonfiction Writing

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

This workshop course focuses on the conventions and forms of creative nonfiction. Topics include scene, reflection, character, metaphor, and other fundamentals; specific forms include flash, lyric essay, and memoir. Students will read the work of accomplished authors, complete numerous and varied writing exercises, read and critique the work of their peers, and write and revise several graded assignments.

Prerequisite: ENG 119


ENG 206 - Introductory Fiction Writing

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3

This workshop course focuses on the basic elements of fiction writing, including character, point of view, conflict, plot, and setting. Students will read the work of accomplished authors, complete numerous and varied writing exercises, read and critique the work of their peers, and write and revise several short stories.

Prerequisite: ENG 119


ENG 223 - Introduction to Native American Literature

Semester: Fall; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3

This course is an examination of selected literature produced by such Native American writers as Momaday, Welch, Erdrich, McNickle, Silko, and others. Students will consider issues of genre, history, and politics as they relate to American literature. Special emphasis is given to the oral tradition and its relationship to contemporary American writing.


ENG 224 - Introduction to African American Literature

Semester: Fall; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3

This course is a study of selected topics in African American literature and criticism. Topics vary but may include such areas as the literature of civil rights, African American memoir, captivity and freedom narratives, African American poetry, theories of race and class, and black feminist writing, among others.


ENG 242 - Modern Dramatic Literature

Semester: Fall; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3

Focusing on script analysis, students consider diverse trends in playwriting and theatrical performances over the past 100 years as viewed through the works of the major playwrights of Europe and the United States. Trends studied include expressionism, surrealism, cubism, and absurdism. This course encourages cross-cultural understanding. This course is cross-listed with THR 242.


ENG 244 - Literature and the Environment

Semester: Spring; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3

This course is a comparative study of the environmental imagination as expressed in literature. By reading and discussing a wide range of literary texts, students investigate timeless and more urgent questions, such as “What is nature?; “What is our responsibility to the environment?”; and “How do various cultures express their relation to the natural world?”.


ENG 245 - Travel Literature

Semester: Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 3

Students in this course explore the world of travel writing through the diverse narratives of selected contemporary and classic travel writers. The course emphasizes literary analysis, with particular attention paid to understanding the cultural and historical contexts of this literature.


ENG 247 - War Literature

Semester: Spring; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3

Students explore how a variety of writers through time have represented the tragedy, trauma, and psychology of war. The course covers fictional and non-fictional works from various historical and literacy periods as well as genres such as epic and lyric poetry, romance, and drama.


ENG 252 - Close Reading of Poetry

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

Students are introduced to the genre of poetry. The course provides students with a foundation in the methods of detailed reading and analysis essential to an understanding of poetry and, more broadly, to the study of literature. The course addresses the basics of prosody, poetic devices such as diction, metaphor, image, and tone, and major verse forms such as the sonnet, elegy, ode, ballad, dramatic monologue, and free verse. The texts reflect the continuity and variation in the history of British and American poetry and provide a sample of works from the 16th century to the present.


ENG 270 - Literature of Montana and the American West

Semester: Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 3

This course examines literature written by and about people living in Montana and the western United States, including American Indians, women, and immigrants.


ENG 272 - British Literature: 800 to 1800

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

The first in the sequence of two British literature surveys, this course provides an introduction to the formative period of British language and literature. Students read representative works from the Anglo-Saxon, Middle English, Renaissance, Restoration, and 18th century periods against their literary, historical, linguistic, and philosophical backgrounds.


ENG 273 - British Literature: 1800 to Present

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3

The second in the sequence of two British literature surveys, this course introduces students to Romantic, Victorian, Modern, and Postmodern literature, analyzing selected texts, from the end of the 18th century to the end of the 20th, against their literary, historical, ideological, and cultural backgrounds.


ENG 282 - American Literature: Origins to 1865

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

This course provides a survey of major literary works from the Puritan, Enlightenment, and Romantic periods. Emphasis is placed on such figures as Edwards, Franklin, Emerson, Hawthorne, Poe, Thoreau, Jacobs, Whitman, Douglass, Melville, and Dickinson. The literature is examined in the context of literary, historical, and philosophical backgrounds.


ENG 283 - American Literature: 1865 to Present

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3

This course provides a survey of major literary works since the Civil War. Emphasis is placed on such figures as Twain, James, Crane, DuBois, Chopin, Wharton, Toomer, Cather, Hughes, Hemingway, and Stevens. The literature is examined in the context of literary, historical, and philosophical backgrounds.


ENG 291 - Contemporary World Fiction

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3

This course introduces students to recent prose fiction, with special attention paid to non-Western and non-American works.


ENG 299 - Independent Study

Semester: Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 1-3

This course allows a superior student to devise and pursue independent study in an area agreed upon in consultation with, and supervised by, a faculty member. Students should be either a major or minor and have a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or greater.


ENG 322 - Renaissance Literature

Semester: Fall; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3

Students examine the Renaissance as expressed in British literature. Typical subjects of study include the early humanism of More; the courtly poetry of Wyatt and Surrey; the sonnets of Drayton, Sidney, and Wroth; the chivalric romance of Spencer; the satire of Nashe; the drama of Kyd, Marlow, Shakespeare, Webster, Jonson, and Ford; the essays of Francis Bacon; and the poetry of Donne, Herbert, Herrick, and Marvel.


ENG 325 - Professional Writing

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

This course teaches concepts, practices, and skills for communicating technical, scientific, or business-related information. Topics include understanding how people read, designing documents, incorporating graphics, writing about statistical results, rewriting, editing, and using the Internet. This course may be especially useful for non-English majors, providing them with the tools and techniques to communicate their messages effectively.

Prerequisite: ENG 119


ENG 328 - Digital and Media Literacy

Semester: Fall; Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 3

This course requires students to analyze media content and survey the technologies of text composition, production, publication, and consumption. Mobile devices—including smart phones, computer tablets, and wearable devices—are rhetorical technologies that we use daily to compose and consume information. Using a multimodal framework, semiotics, and a variety of media theories, we will analyze texts ranging from printing press manuscripts to Internet viral videos. Students will learn to communicate and think critically about the intersection of information, identity, culture, and technology and will increase their skills as they compose their own original digital projects.

Prerequisite: ENG 120


ENG 331 - Literary Criticism

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

This course introduces students to current controversies in literary criticism. The course discusses approaches to literary analysis such as deconstruction, cultural criticism, and postcolonialism. Students typically use a casebook method, observing how critics from divergent backgrounds interpret a single text. Students critique these various approaches and refine their own critical practices.


ENG 333 - British Romantic Literature

Semester: Fall; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3

This course examines a wide range of British Romantic texts. Students read and analyze selected works against the literary, historical, and philosophical background of late 18th and early 19th century England. Representative authors include Blake, Radcliffe, Wordsworth, Wollstonecraft, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats, and DeQuincy.


ENG 334 - The British Novel

Semester: Spring; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3

This course surveys the rise and development of the British novel. It includes an analysis of such 18th century writers as Defoe, Sterne, Fielding, Radcliffe, and Burney; early 19th-century writers such as Austen, Shelley, and Scott; such Victorian novelists as Dickens, the Brontë sisters, Eliot, Thackeray, Trollope, and Hardy; and such Modernists as Conrad, Woolf, Joyce, Forster, and Lawrence.


ENG 338 - Literature, Film, and Media

Semester: Spring; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3

This course investigates interrelations among literature, film, and other forms of non-print media. Subject matter will include literary works, films, television, web-content, and emerging technologies through which cultural narratives are increasingly transmitted and developed. Theories of audience reception, textual production, and modes of critical interpretation will be emphasized.


ENG 343 - Readings in Contemporary Poetry

Semester: Spring; Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 3

This course familiarizes students with various forms of and approaches to contemporary poetry. With a focus on both tradition and innovation, we will read widely from recent works of poetry, and students will experiment with numerous poetry-writing techniques and styles drawn from our readings. The class emphasizes students’ dual roles as creative writers and critics/reviewers, and coursework includes critical as well as creative assignments. This course does not fulfill a core requirement in literature.

Prerequisite: ENG 204


ENG 345 - Readings in Contemporary Creative Nonfiction

Semester: Spring; Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 3

This course familiarizes students with various forms of and approaches to contemporary creative nonfiction. With a focus on both tradition and innovation, we will read widely from recent works of creative nonfiction, and students will experiment with numerous nonfiction writing techniques and styles drawn from our readings. The class emphasizes students’ dual roles as creative writers and critics/reviewers, and coursework includes critical as well as creative assignments. This course does not fulfill a core requirement in literature.

Prerequisite: ENG 205


ENG 346 - Readings in Contemporary Fiction

Semester: Spring; Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 3

This course familiarizes students with various forms of and approaches to contemporary fiction. With a focus on both tradition and innovation, we will read widely from recent works of fiction, and students will experiment with numerous fiction-writing techniques and styles drawn from our readings. The class emphasizes students’ dual roles as creative writers and critics/reviewers, and coursework includes critical as well as creative assignments. This course does not fulfill a core requirement in literature.

Prerequisite: ENG 206


ENG 354 - Writing Consultant Practicum

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3

Students examine current scholarship in writing center theory and practice and develop instructional approaches to collaborative learning. Course discussions stemming from these readings, subsequent research that students conduct, and students' routine observations of writing consultants inform several writing projects.

Prerequisite: ENG 119, ENG 120, and official endorsement from faculty member


ENG 359 - History and Grammar of English

Semester: Fall; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3

Students are introduced to the linguistic and theoretic approaches to the study of English, including phonology and morphology. Students pursue an in-depth study of syntax, focusing on the grammar of words, phrases, clauses, and sentences. Students also review the history of English from proto-Germanic to the development of regional dialects, cultural variations, and “global” English.


ENG 362 - Literary Modernism

Semester: Fall; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3

Students examine the major movement in Western art in the first half of the 20th century as reflected in representative literary texts. Attention is focused on the questions: What is modernism? What is its relation to naturalism and realism? How does literary art fuse with the other arts during this period? Authors may include Joyce, Stein, Pound, Eliot, Williams, Cather, Toomer, Ford, Lawrence, Woolf, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, and Faulkner.


ENG 365 - Journalism

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

Providing an introduction to writing print, broadcast, and multimedia articles and producing a professional publication, this course is strongly recommended for all students participating on the student newspaper.


ENG 370 - Religion and Literature

Semester: Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 3

A study of religious issues, conflict, and hopes in modern literature. Studied works will vary from year to year, but they may include texts by authors such as Melville, Tolstoy, Hemingway, Flannery O'Connor, and John Updike. This is a writing-intensive course.


ENG 374 - Advanced Poetry Writing

Semester: Fall; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3

This workshop is an extension and intensification of ENG 204. This course will further investigate the conventions of poetry writing (e.g., image, rhythm, metaphor) and introduce additional poetic forms, including the sestina, villanelle, and prose poem. Students will produce and revise a wide range of poems, culminating in a chapbook of poems. In addition, students will memorize and recite several poems, identify suitable print and online markets for their work, and submit for publication.

Prerequisite: ENG 204


ENG 375 - Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing

Semester: Spring; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3

This workshop course is an extension and intensification of ENG 205. The course will further investigate the conventions of creative nonfiction (e.g., complex characterization, setting, reflection/interpretation) and introduce additional forms of narrative nonfiction, such as travel writing and profile. In addition to numerous short writing samples, students will produce and revise a feature-length piece of narrative nonfiction. Students will also learn how to conduct and incorporate research and interviews into their writing and how to pitch projects to editors for publication.

Prerequisite: ENG 205


ENG 376 - Advanced Fiction Writing

Semester: Fall; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3

This workshop course is an extension and intensification of ENG 206. This course will further investigate the conventions of fiction writing (e.g., voice, point of view, complex characterization) and introduce additional forms of fiction writing, such as linked short stories and flash fiction. In addition to numerous exercises, students will produce and revise 25+ pages of original work. Students will also identify suitable print and online markets for their work and submit for publication.

Prerequisite: ENG 206


ENG 418 - Writing and Publishing in New York City

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

Students will meet regularly throughout the term and spend eight days in New York City attending workshops and seminars on publishing, editing, and freelance writing. They meet professional writers, editors, and agents who introduce them to all aspects of the writing and publishing professions. Students also visit museums and attend cultural and literary events.

Prerequisite: ENG 120


ENG 420 - Methods and Materials: Teaching English in the Secondary School

Semester: Fall; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3

This seminar requires focused study and consultation with a public school English/language arts teacher or other acceptable professional in the field. Hours will be arranged in consultation with the content area professor, the appropriate education professor, the student, and the professional mentor. The course focuses on English pedagogy with special attention to reading and writing instruction. Students study methods for creating a classroom conducive to learning, select materials for motivational and instructional purposes, incorporate technology in classroom strategies, evaluate and assess student work, integrate the language arts with other content areas, and examine the scope and sequence of literature and writing for grades 5-12. This seminar strongly emphasizes practical methodologies and is the capstone course for the English education major.

Prerequisite: EDC 040, admission to the teacher education program; senior standing


ENG 445 - The American Novel

Semester: Spring; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3

Students examine American novels from the 19th century to the present. Attention is given both to the genre of the novel as well as to the individual literary works. Content varies, but representative topics include the way in which personal and national identities are shaped or defined in the fictional texts, the role of the marketplace in influencing literary practice, and the relation between American fiction and philosophy.


ENG 447 - The American Short Story

Semester: Spring; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3

Students are introduced to the genre of the short story, emphasizing major American writers from the 19th century to the present. Particular attention is directed to historical and cultural backgrounds. Students cultivate skills in critical analysis by focusing on issues of character, plot, theme, point of view, setting, tone, style, and other literary devices as they function within the context of individual stories.


ENG 450 - Internship

Semester: Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 1-12

This course is a guided work experience in an already established place of business. The student must arrange the internship in agreement with the instructor and the Office of Career Services. The internship should relate to the student's major or minor area of study. Contract is required.

Prerequisite: junior or senior standing


ENG 452 - American Poetry in the 20th Century

Semester: Fall; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3

An in-depth study of American poetry in the 20th century, focusing on representative poets in the context of literary and cultural history. Representative poets include Pound, Lowell, H.D., Eliot, Frost, Stevens, Williams, Oppen, Niedecker, Sexton, Rich, Kerouac, Rexroth, and Ronan. Particular emphasis is on developing and strengthening students’ skills in the close reading of poetry.


ENG 456 - Studies in Drama

Semester: Fall; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3

Students examine authors, themes, and/or movements significant in British, American, European, or world drama. It includes reading and analysis of selected plays. Focus is on variety in period, type, and technique. Content varies.


ENG 471 - Studies in Shakespeare

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3

Students engage in the advanced study of Shakespeare's works, analyzing them within their literary, historical, theatrical, linguistic, and cultural contexts. Particular attention in this course is devoted to the major critical and theoretical approaches to Shakespeare, providing a foundation for students intending to go to graduate school in English or teach English at the secondary level.


ENG 482 - Capstone in Creative Writing

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3

This course is the capstone for the creative writing concentration. In this course, the students will produce advanced creative writing work, put together their final portfolios (including both writing new work and revised previous works), and organize a public reading.

Prerequisite: ENG 251 and one of the following: ENG 317, ENG 324, or ENG 319


ENG 490 - Literary Studies Capstone

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3

In this course, students will design, develop, and research an independent literary project in a selected area of literary studies, culminating in a major research essay that demonstrates mastery of the critical, analytical, theoretical, and writing skills essential to the advanced study of literature. Students will work independently and collaboratively under the supervision of an English faculty member.

Prerequisite: senior standing


ENG 491 - Literary Journal I

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

This course focuses on the production of Sun & Sandstone, the undergraduate literary journal. In this course, we will read other literary journals and review submissions to Sun & Sandstone, hold meetings to determine what pieces will be accepted, and design the journal itself.

Prerequisite: ENG 251, ENG 319, or permission of instructor


ENG 493 - Literary Journal II

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3

This is a continuation of ENG 491: Sun & Sandstone Literary Journal I. In this course, we will bring the annual issue of Sun & Sandstone to completion. Editors will meet to complete submission review, complete correspondence with rejected and accepted authors, and finish journal design and production.

Prerequisite: ENG 251, ENG 319, or permission of instructor


ENG 499 - Independent Study

Semester: Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 1-3

This course allows a superior student to devise and pursue independent study in an area agreed upon in consultation with, and supervised by, a faculty member. Students should be either a major or minor and have a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or greater.

Prerequisite: junior or senior standing


  • Stephen Germic, Professor
  • Andrew Kirk, Professor
  • Jacqueline Dundas, Associate Professor
  • Precious McKenzie, Associate Professor
  • Nicholas Plunkey, Associate Professor
  • Ashley Kunsa, Assistant Professor
  • Ashlynn Reynolds-Dyk, Assistant Professor
  • Amber Harris, Instructor