Equestrian Studies

Course Catalog: Equestrian Studies

The equestrian studies program at Rocky Mountain College provides the student a venue for his or her passion for horses. The program offers a firm foundation in equitation to increase skills as a rider; a progressive training approach to encourage the student to form a valuable structure for educating a horse using generally accepted training principles; and a solid background in equine management fundamentals. These fundamentals include a broad-based series of courses designed to give each student exposure to the reality of living with and being responsible for horses. From the basic care of the horse through veterinary courses and stable management, to responsible breeding program development with selection and reproduction, to managing a program of therapeutic riding, the program encourages each student to find his or her place.

When core subjects are met, the student can choose a program increasingly more tailored to his or her interests, whether it is teaching, training, business, therapeutic riding, or technology implementation. Combined with Rocky Mountain College's traditional liberal arts program, students are provided a variety of experiences promoting lifelong learning and an understanding of the world around them. This multifaceted approach not only prepares the equine student to succeed in a complex and ever-changing global equestrian industry, but to meet the challenges of life in a world of diversity as well.

Equestrian facility fees are not included in basic tuition and are charged in addition to tuition, fees, and other incidental expenses normally charged during registration (see the "Tuition and Fees" section).

Learning Outcomes

Equine Management Concentration
Students who graduate with a concentration in equine management will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate key elements in equine business planning, marketing, and development;
  2. Articulate economic factors impacting the equine industry;
  3. Identify equine revenue sources and track both fixed and variable costs in the equine industry;
  4. Exhibit practical knowledge relating to the management of an equine facility;
  5. Demonstrate proactive, safe, efficient stable management skills relating to horse maintenance, nutrition, and health care;
  6. Demonstrate a clear understanding of safe, humane handling practices;
  7. Identify ideal conformation as it relates to equine form and function; and
  8. Demonstrate the characteristics of an equestrian professional in appearance, language, and conduct.

Equine Science Concentration
Students who graduate with a concentration in equine science will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate proactive, safe, efficient stable management skills relating to horse maintenance, nutrition, and health care;
  2. Demonstrate a clear understanding of safe, humane handling practices;
  3. Communicate ideal conformation as it relates to equine form and function;
  4. Demonstrate the characteristics of an equestrian professional in appearance, language, and conduct; and
  5. Demonstrate technical riding competency.

Equine Science Pre-Vet Concentration
Students who graduate with a concentration in equine science pre-vet will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate proactive, safe, efficient stable management skills relating to horse maintenance, nutrition, and health care;
  2. Demonstrate a clear understanding of safe, humane handling practices;
  3. Identify ideal conformation as it relates to equine form and function;
  4. Demonstrate the characteristics of an equestrian professional in appearance, language, and conduct; and
  5. Effectively communicate scientific ideas and the results of scientific inquiry.

Equitation, Training, and Riding Concentration
Students who graduate with a concentration in equitation, training, and riding instruction will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate proactive, safe, efficient stable management skills related to horse maintenance, nutrition, and health care;
  2. Demonstrate technical riding proficiency within a chosen riding discipline;
  3. Demonstrate a clear understanding of safe, humane training practices;
  4. Identify ideal conformation as it relates to equine form and function;
  5. Demonstrate the characteristics of an equestrian professional in appearance, language, and conduct;
  6. Demonstrate a chronological training methodology as it pertains to various disciplines; and
  7. Demonstrate effective equestrian instructional techniques.

Therapeutic Riding Concentration
Students who graduate with a concentration in therapeutic riding will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an applied understanding of therapeutic horsemanship teaching techniques for a broad spectrum of disorders and disabilities;
  2. Demonstrate relevant skills for PATH certification;
  3. Demonstrate proactive, safe, efficient stable management skills related to horse maintenance, nutrition, and health care;
  4. Demonstrate technical riding proficiency within a chosen riding discipline;
  5. Demonstrate a clear understanding of safe, humane training practices;
  6. Identify ideal conformation as it relates to equine form and function and the therapeutic need of clients with disabilities;
  7. Demonstrate the characteristics of an equestrian professional in appearance, language, and conduct; and
  8. Demonstrate the application of a chronological training method as it pertains to various disciplines.

Major in Equestrian Studies

Students have a choice of one of five concentrations in the equestrian studies major:
Equine Management
Equine Science
Equine Science with Pre-Vet
Equitation, Training, and Riding Instruction
Therapeutic Riding

Equine Management Concentration

A minimum of 59 semester hours is required, including:
EQS 101: Introduction to Equestrian Studies
EQS 102: Equine Conformation and Selection
EQS 201: Equine Preventive Medicine
EQS 300: Reproduction and Growth
EQS 308: Ranch and Stable Management
EQS 318: Equine Nutrition
EQS 402: Equine Marketing
EQS 450: Internship (3 semester hours)
EQS 482: Equestrian Capstone

Also required:
ACC 210: Foundations of Accounting
BIO 120: Principles of Biology
BSA 101: Introduction to Business
BSA 218: New Venture Creation
BSA 303: Principles of Management
COM 201: Interpersonal Communication
COM 306: Organizational Communication
ECO 205: Principles of Economics
ESC 314: Range Ecology

Complete either:
EQS 111 Basic Horsemanship I and EQS 112 Basic Horsemanship II
or
EQS 121: Fundamental Horsemanship I and EQS 122: Fundamental Horsemanship II

Note: All courses in the major must be completed with a grade of at least "C-."

Equine Science Concentration

A minimum of 54 semester hours is required, including:
EQS 100: Volunteer Experience in Therapeutic Riding
EQS 101: Introduction to Equestrian Studies
EQS 102: Equine Conformation and Selection
EQS 201: Equine Preventive Medicine
EQS 214: Equine Judging
EQS 300: Reproduction and Growth
EQS 308: Ranch and Stable Management
EQS 315: Intermediate Equine Judging
EQS 318: Equine Nutrition
EQS 402: Equine Marketing
EQS 415: Advanced Equine Judging
EQS 450: Internship (3 semester hours)
EQS 482: Equestrian Capstone

Also required:
ENG 325: Professional Writing

Complete either:
EQS 111/112: Basic Horsemanship I / Basic Horsemanship II
or
EQS 121/122: Fundamental Horsemanship I / Fundamental Horsemanship II

And complete either:
EQS 229/230: Basic Hunter Seat Equitation I / Basic Hunter Seat Equitation II
or
EQS 231/232: Hunter Seat Equitation I / Hunter Seat Equitation II

Note: All courses in the major must be completed with a grade of at least "C-."

Equine Science with Pre-Vet Concentration

A minimum of 66 semester hours is required, including:
Equestrian: 18 semester hours
EQS 102: Equine Conformation and Selection
EQS 121: Fundamental Horsemanship I
EQS 201: Equine Preventive Medicine
EQS 300: Reproduction and Growth
EQS 318: Equine Nutrition
EQS 482: Equestrian Capstone

Sciences and Mathematics: 48 semester hours
Biology (21 semester hours):
BIO 120: Principles of Biology
BIO 203: Genetics
BIO 321: Human Anatomy and Physiology I
BIO 350: Microbiology
BIO 452: Biochemistry I

Chemistry (16 semester hours):
CHM 101: General Chemistry I
CHM 102: General Chemistry II
CHM 251: Organic Chemistry I
CHM 252: Organic Chemistry II

Physics (8 semester hours):
Either
PHS 101: Fundamental Physics I and PHS 102: Fundamental Physics II
or
PHS 201: General Physics I and PHS 202: General Physics II

Mathematics (3 semester hours):
MAT 210: Probability and Statistics

Recommended Courses:
BIO 322: Human Anatomy and Physiology II
BIO 347: Animal Behavior
MAT 175: Calculus I

Note: All courses in the major must be completed with a grade of at least "C-."

Equitation, Training, and Riding Instruction Concentration

A minimum of 60 semester hours is required, including:
EQS 101: Introduction to Equestrian Studies
EQS 102: Equine Conformation and Selection
EQS 121: Fundamental Horsemanship I
EQS 122: Fundamental Horsemanship II
EQS 201: Equine Preventive Medicine
EQS 214: Equine Judging
EQS 231: Hunter Seat Equitation I
EQS 232: Hunter Seat Equitation II

Also required:
EQS 300: Reproduction and Growth
EQS 308: Ranch and Stable Management
EQS 318: Equine Nutrition
EQS 321: Advanced Horse Training I
EQS 322: Advanced Horse Training II
EQS 325: Basic Colt Training I
EQS 326: Basic Colt Training II
EQS 401: Techniques of Teaching Riding
EQS 402: Equine Marketing
EQS 405: Advanced Techniques of Teaching Riding
EQS 450: Internship (3 semester hours)
EQS 482: Equestrian Capstone

Note: All courses in the major must be completed with a grade of at least "C-."

Therapeutic Riding Concentration

A minimum of 56 semester hours in EQS and HHP courses is required, plus 21 credits for the minor in psychology, including:

EQS 100: Volunteer Experience in Therapeutic Riding
EQS 101: Introduction to Equestrian Studies
EQS 102: Equine Conformation and Selection
EQS 201: Equine Preventive Medicine
EQS 209: Principles of Therapeutic Riding
EQS 309: Advanced Therapeutic Riding Instructor Training
EQS 318: Equine Nutrition
EQS 401: Techniques of Teaching Riding
EQS 405: Advanced Techniques of Teaching Riding
EQS 410: Therapeutic Riding, Issues and Ethics
EQS 450: Internship (3 credits)
EQS 482: Equestrian Capstone

Also required:
HHP 161: Foundations of Human Structure and Function
HHP 316: Motor Learning

Complete either:
EQS 111 Basic Horsemanship I and EQS 112 Basic Horsemanship II
or
EQS 121: Fundamental Horsemanship I and EQS 122: Fundamental Horsemanship II

And complete either:
EQS 229 and EQS 230: Basic Hunter Seat Equitation I and Basic Hunter Seat Equitation II
or
EQS 231 and EQS 232: Hunter Seat Equitation I and Hunter Seat Equitation II

Also required:
A minor in psychology must be completed. See the "Psychology" section of the catalog for requirements.

Note: All courses in the major must be completed with a grade of at least "C-."

Minor in Equestrian Studies

A minimum of 21 semester hours is required, including:
EQS 101: Introduction to Equestrian Studies
EQS 102: Equine Conformation and Selection
EQS 201: Equine Preventive Medicine

The additional 12 semester hours (minimum of six credits of upper-division courses) are to be chosen in consultation with an equestrian faculty advisor. At least one equestrian skills class is recommended.

ACC 210 - Foundations of Accounting

Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3

This course is designed to give students a basic understanding of the uses and limitations of accounting information, particularly from financial statements. Students will understand how to take information from the financial statements and make informed business decisions.


BIO 120 - Principles of Biology

Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 4

An introductory survey course that covers cell structure and metabolism, patterns of inheritance, molecular genetics, evolutionary mechanisms, and diversity. The weekly laboratory sessions teach basic laboratory skills, experimental design, application of statistics, and communication of results via laboratory reports. This course is appropriate for both major and non-majors. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory period per week.


BIO 203 - Genetics

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 4

The course provides a detailed overview of the mechanisms of heredity. Topics include Mendelian, quantitative, and molecular genetics. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory session per week.

Prerequisite: BIO 120 and CHM 101
Corequesite: IDS 243


BIO 321 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 4

A course requiring students to incorporate concepts from physics, chemistry, and biology to understand the interface between human structure and function and the regulatory mechanisms in play. Topics include tissue types, skeletal, muscular, nervous, respiratory, and reproductive anatomy and physiology. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory session per week. Human cadavers are used in the laboratory.

Prerequisite: BIO 120 and CHM 101 and CHM 102. CHM 251 and CHM 252 and PHS 102 or PHS 202 are highly recommended.


BIO 322 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 4

In this continuation of BIO 321, topics include digestive, cardiovascular, renal, urinary acid-base balance, endocrine, and immune system anatomy and physiology. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory session per week. Human cadavers are used in the laboratory.

Prerequisite: BIO 321


BIO 347 - Animal Behavior

Semester: Spring; Even years
Semester hours: 3

In this continuation of BIO 321, topics include digestive, cardiovascular, renal, urinary acid-base balance, endocrine, and immune system anatomy and physiology. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory session per week. Human cadavers are used in the laboratory.

Prerequisite: BIO 306


BIO 350 - Microbiology

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 4

This course is an investigation of the structure, metabolism, and reproduction of microorganisms. The course will emphasize understanding microbiology as it pertains to human health, including normal flora, disease mechanisms, immunology and immunity, and a sampling of major microbial diseases. In the laboratory, students will detect, isolate, and identify both harmless and pathogenic microbes.

Prerequisite: BIO 203 and CHM 102, both passed with a grade of C- or higher


BIO 452 - Biochemistry I

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 5

Biochemistry focuses on the study of the molecules and chemical reactions of life, bringing together principles learned in biology and chemistry. After an introduction to the chemistry and structure of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins, discussions of enzyme structure and kinetics set the stage for a detailed exploration of metabolism and its regulation. The laboratory component of this course involves a semester-long integrated project that requires independent student work. This project incorporates many different types of instrumentation, including low pressure chromatography, electrophoresis, UV-visible spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and ultrafiltration. Three lecture hours plus one laboratory lecture hour per week. Significant time working independently in the laboratory is required.

Prerequisite: CHM 220 or CHM 252 with a grade of C- or higher; BIO 120 is strongly recommended. Junior or senior standing is required.


BSA 101 - Introduction to Business

Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3

A beginning business course designed to introduce students to the areas of business study, including historical foundations of America's free enterprise system, ethics and social responsibility in the business setting, entrepreneurship, the legal structures of business, marketing, and general management.


BSA 218 - New Venture Creation

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

This course is an introduction to entrepreneurship and new venture creation. It will present and practice the fundamentals of what is involved in conceptualizing, starting, and growing a successful business. The primary focus of the course is the initial planning processes, and considerations that one must investigate and navigate through, in launching a start-up venture. Topics covered over the course of the semester will include generating and validating ideas, protecting intellectual property, initial strategic planning, sources of start-up capital, procuring merchandise or resource inputs, and developing consistency in operations. The goal of this course is to take students on a guided tour that enables them to develop an understanding of what is involved in starting a business, as well as helping them to determine whether they have the mindset and skills necessary to own and operate their own venture.

Prerequisite: ACC 210, ECO 205


BSA 303 - Principles of Management

Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3

Students examine the management functions and basic concepts and principles of management, including planning, organization, coordination, control, job design, and human resource management. Topics in human resource management include recruitment, selection, administration of personnel policies, and dismissals. This course is often required as a prerequisite for master’s-level business programs.

Prerequisite: ACC 210, ECO 205


CHM 101 - General Chemistry I

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 4

This course introduces students to the science of chemistry. The concepts of atoms, molecules, bonding, and energy successfully explain the properties of matter and how reactions happen. Goals of this course include introducing students to representative materials and reactions, to important models and theories of the science, and to the symbols and language of chemists. The laboratory will involve observations of elements, compounds and their reactions (including synthesis), and quantitative measurements of properties or amounts of matter. Three hours of lecture, one two-hour laboratory session, and one hour of recitation per week.

Prerequisite: MAT 100 or placement into higher mathematics course


CHM 102 - General Chemistry II

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 4

This course will further develop the principles presented in CHM 101 with emphasis on the following core concepts: chemical kinetics, chemical equilibria, solution and acidbase chemistry, thermodynamics of reactions, and electrochemistry. Examples used in this course will point to the various branches of chemical studies (organic, physical, biological, inorganic, analytical, geological, materials, and nuclear). The knowledge and skills gained over the two semesters will be applied to the analysis of a contemporary topic or issue in chemistry. The laboratory experiments are designed to explore chemical principles and to expose students to more advanced chemical instrumentation in the department. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory session per week.

Prerequisite: CHM 101 with a grade of C- or higher


CHM 251 - Organic Chemistry I

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 4

This course is an introduction to the chemistry of carbon-containing compounds, concentrating on the structures, properties, and reactions of some of the important families of organic compounds. Considerable emphasis is placed on reaction mechanisms and stereochemistry. The laboratory experiments introduce techniques for the isolation and preparation of compounds. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory session per week.

Prerequisite: CHM 102 with a grade of C- or higher


CHM 252 - Organic Chemistry II

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 4

This course, a continuation of CHM 251, concentrates on the chemistry of additional important families of organic compounds, emphasizing reaction mechanisms, synthesis, stereochemistry, and spectroscopy. The laboratory experiments include the synthesis and analysis of compounds with biological and industrial importance and qualitative analysis.

Prerequisite: CHM 251 with a grade of C- or higher. CHM 220 will not be accepted as a prerequisite for this course.


COM 201 - Interpersonal Communication

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3

This course examines how intimate, personal, and professional relationships are created and maintained. Students develop an increased awareness of and sensitivity to communication that facilitates interpersonal relationships, as well as communication that creates obstacles to building relationships. Topics discussed include perception, self-concept, listening, and conflict.


COM 306 - Organizational Communication

Semester: Fall; Odd years
Semester hours: 3

This course examines how communication occurs in large cooperative networks, especially in professional work settings. It focuses on the roles leadership, management, and conflict resolution play in larger organizations. By the end of the course, students will understand how the values and cultures of any organization emerge through communication.

Prerequisite: COM 102 or permission of instructor


ECO 205 - Principles of Economics

Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3

This course will introduce the principles of firm-level decision making, consumer choices and their rationale, differing forms of industry competition, and how market-clearing prices and quantities are determined in a market environment. Additionally, the students will gain an understanding of how the major participants in the economy interact and what drives economic growth, interest rates, and inflation. The possible impacts of a variety of fiscal and monetary policy choices will be presented to assist the student in understanding how those policies will impact incomes, employment, and trade for a country. At the completion of the course, the student should have a basic understanding of both the microeconomic and macroeconomic environments and their impacts on businesses and the general population.


ENG 325 - Professional Writing

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

This course teaches concepts, practices, and skills for communicating technical, scientific, or business-related information. Topics include understanding how people read, designing documents, incorporating graphics, writing about statistical results, rewriting, editing, and using the Internet. This course may be especially useful for non-English majors, providing them with the tools and techniques to communicate their messages effectively.

Prerequisite: ENG 119


EQS 100 - Volunteer Experience in Therapeutic Riding

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

All students interested in entering the therapeutic riding program must first participate in the volunteer experience. Students will volunteer in an established therapeutic riding program.


EQS 101 - Introduction to Equestrian Studies

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

The student focuses on the basic anatomy and physiology of the horse. Equine evolution, the study of various breeds, and genetics are also emphasized, along with an overview of the horse industry.


EQS 102 - Equine Conformation and Selection

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3

This course focuses on equine structure and the evaluation of how structural anomalies relate to lameness. Students learn and practice selecting horses best suited for intended uses in terms of breed, structure, and temperament.

Prerequisite: EQS 101


EQS 111 - Basic Horsemanship I

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

This course introduces horse behavior, correct handling of the horse, riding in a balanced body position, and effective body control of the horse. Focal topics include safety, rider aid coordination, rider strength, and practical horse management in a stabled environment.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into equestrian program


EQS 112 - Basic Horsemanship II

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3

This course continues from EQS111. Students will extend body control of the horse through lateral movements, riding in a collected frame, and the collection/extension of gaits. Building upon the riding position gained in EQS111, students will ride with and without stirrups to gain balance, strength, and an independent seat. Focal topics include rider aid coordination through all gaits and lateral maneuvers, rider strength, rider equitation, and increased independence of horse management in a stabled environment.

Prerequisite: EQS 111


EQS 121 - Fundamental Horsemanship I

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

This class introduces the fundamental theories of horsemanship, the centered seat, and balanced riding. While these theories apply equally to both English and Western disciplines, only Western tack is used. Additionally, students develop strength, agility, and coordination, as well as maintain their assigned horse in a show barn atmosphere with emphasis on stall maintenance and safe feeding practices.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into equestrian program and permission of instructor


EQS 122 - Fundamental Horsemanship II

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3

This class is a continuation of EQS 121 and builds on those skills with further emphasis upon developing proficiency. A logical training progression is established within a variety of Western venues. The emphasis upon maintaining a healthy horse in a show barn atmosphere is continued.

Prerequisite: EQS 121


EQS 201 - Equine Preventive Medicine

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

Students study common equine health practices including parasitology, diseases, pre-purchase examinations, lameness, first-aid measures, and the establishment of horse health programs.

Prerequisite: EQS 102


EQS 209 - Principles of Therapeutic Riding

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3

In this introductory course to therapeutic riding, students will explore the basic principles of therapeutic riding; medical terminology; physical, cognitive, and sensory impairments; and the use of safety and adaptive equipment. Interaction with therapy students, their parents, and health professionals will be stressed. Students will have the opportunity to participate in a variety of hands-on experiences.

Prerequisite: EQS 100


EQS 214 - Equine Judging

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

Students learn and actively practice the evaluation of horses and riders in various types of competition, including classes in halter, Western pleasure, and hunter under saddle. There is a strong speech and critical-thinking component in this course as students learn to develop oral reasons for defending class placement.

Prerequisite: EQS 102


EQS 229 - Basic Hunter Seat Equitation I

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

This course introduces students to equitation fundamentals required for riding the hunter type horse. Introductory training skills revisit advanced body control maneuvers with hunter type horses. Students will gain in equitation, riding strength, balance, and aid coordination.

Prerequisite: EQS 112 or EQS 122


EQS 230 - Basic Hunter Seat Equitation II

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3

This course further develops equitation fundamentals required for riding the hunter type horse. Introductory training skills continue to develop advanced body control maneuvers with hunter type horses. Students will negotiate obstacles in a jumping grid and a basic working hunter pattern.

Prerequisite: EQS 229


EQS 231 - Hunter Seat Equitation I

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

Through the development and assessment of rider and horse skill level, this course establishes a training program for starting a horse over fences. Show ring etiquette develops fundamentals for successful competition and deepens the student's understanding of the equine industry.

Prerequisite: EQS 122


EQS 232 - Hunter Seat Equitation II

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3

This course is a continuation of EQS 231. By furthering the skills necessary to show a hunter over fences, students gain in strength, balance, and control.

Prerequisite: EQS 231


EQS 299 - Independent Study

Semester: Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 1-3

This course allows a superior student to devise and pursue independent study in an area agreed upon in consultation with, and supervised by, a faculty member. Students should be either a major or minor and have a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or greater.


EQS 300 - Reproduction and Growth

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3

This course examines anatomy and physiology of reproduction in the horse, endocrinology, principles of artificial insemination, embryo transfer, genetics, breeding systems, application of the scientific method, and care and management of breeding stock. This course will be accepted as a biology elective, provided students have completed BIO 120, CHM 101, and CHM 102. This course is highly recommended for students pursuing veterinary school or graduate studies in animal science.

Prerequisite: EQS 201


EQS 308 - Ranch and Stable Management

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

This course will provide an overview of the business essentials of the equine enterprise. This information will be applied by the students in the ranch project. Students will tour area facilities and survey industry professionals to gain insight into the business practices of the equine industry.

Prerequisite: EQS 201


EQS 309 - Advanced Therapeutic Riding Instructor Training

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

This course covers all aspects of being a therapeutic riding instructor, including teaching to the appropriate therapeutic level of a student's physical and cognitive abilities, the precautions and contraindications to therapeutic riding, therapy student assessment and program development, and facility and therapy horse management. Students will organize and teach lessons, assign students to horses and volunteers, and maintain progress notes. This course will go through phase one of PATH certification.

Prerequisite: EQS 209


EQS 315 - Intermediate Equine Judging

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

Students engage in and practice the evaluation of horses and riders for competition on an advanced level, including classes in trail, Western riding, reining, hunter hack, and working hunter. Students continue developing oral reasoning and presentation skills for defending class placement.

Prerequisite: EQS 214


EQS 318 - Equine Nutrition

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

Through examination of the gastrointestinal system of the horse, the student will be presented with best practices in the management of dental arcade, the digestive system, and the nutrient content of horse feeds.

Prerequisite: EQS 201


EQS 321 - Advanced Horse Training I

Semester: Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 3

Students learn and practice advanced training procedures and the selection of proper horses for individual events, perfecting both the rider's and the horse's skills to an intermediate competitive level.

Prerequisite: junior standing, EQS 121, EQS 122, EQS 231, EQS 232, EQS 325, and EQS 326


EQS 322 - Advanced Horse Training II

Semester: Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 3

This course is a continuation of EQS 321 with a higher level of skill and expertise employed.

Prerequisite: junior standing and EQS 321


EQS 325 - Basic Colt Training I

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

Through practical application, the student develops skills and techniques by following a logical progression of training for a two- or three-year-old colt in a stress-free atmosphere.

Prerequisite: sophomore standing and EQS 122


EQS 326 - Basic Colt Training II

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3

This course, a continuation of EQS 325, will cover the assessment of a colt's capabilities and begin advanced training techniques.

Prerequisite: sophomore standing and EQS 325


EQS 343 - Therapeutic Riding Professional Development

Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3

This class will encourage professional development in therapeutic riding. In this class the focus will be on the therapy horse and its humane training practices and will offer a more comprehensive look into running a program. The student will be involved in weekly training of the therapy horses and assist in therapy lessons.

Prerequisite: EQS 100


EQS 400 - Advanced Reproduction

Semester: Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 3

The student focuses on common breeding problems such as organizing and operating a routine teasing program, natural breeding, artificial insemination, and improving conception rates. Students engage in practical application in this course. Class is limited to six students. This course is highly recommended for students pursuing veterinary school or graduate studies in animal science.

Prerequisite: EQS 300


EQS 401 - Techniques of Teaching Riding

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

Students practice methods of teaching riding and engage in practical experience as a tutor or aide in teaching basic equitation. The student also learns and practices the scope and sequence of planning lessons and teaching student skills. There is a strong speech component in this course.

Prerequisite: EQS 121, EQS 122, EQS 231, and EQS 232; EQS 325 and EQS 326 also recommended


EQS 402 - Equine Marketing

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3

This course features the promotion of the horse and individual as well as equine-related business ventures through the introduction and refinement of the student's performance in industry specific marketing skills. The skills covered in the course include photography and videography of the horse, still image and video editing, video reproduction and publishing, image branding, written and verbal skills for promotion, and advertisement creation for various channels from web-based marketing to print. Additionally, students will research current market trends for pricing and create and implement a marketing plan for a horse. This is a capstone class for equine business majors. Students must have ready access to equipment for both still and moving image capture and editing.

Prerequisite: junior standing


EQS 405 - Advanced Techniques of Teaching Riding

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3

The student furthers his or her teaching techniques through experience as an equitation tutor or aide with an emphasis upon the development of riding activities such as clinics or riding camps. There is a strong speech component in this course.

Prerequisite: EQS 401


EQS 410 - Therapeutic Riding, Issues, and Ethics

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3

Students will focus on the administration of and teaching in a therapeutic riding program, including organization, emergency procedures, safety regulations, risk management, documentation, and written policies and procedures. Students will learn to provide proper documentation for recognized legal business structures and organizations including those for corporations and 501(c)3s as well as the standards for PATH centers. Students with the required amount of instructional hours will be prepared to take the PATH national registered instructor examination during this course.

Prerequisite: EQS 309 and First aid and CPR certified


EQS 415 - Advanced Equine Judging

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3

Students review the principles learned in EQS 214 and EQS 315 and broaden their knowledge of competition rules. They further develop oral and thinking skills for the presentation of reasons at the intercollegiate competitive level. There may be opportunities for intercollegiate judge competition.

Prerequisite: EQS 214 and EQS 315


EQS 421 - Advanced Horse Training III

Semester: Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 3

For the furthering of training and riding skills, this course leads the student toward a more independent development of his or her own training program. Students are expected to develop, organize, and produce a training plan suited to their specific goals.

Prerequisite: senior standing


EQS 422 - Advanced Horse Training IV

Semester: Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 3

This course is a continuation of EQS 421.

Prerequisite: EQS 421


EQS 450 - Internship

Semester: Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 1-12

This course is a guided work experience in an already established place of business. The student must arrange the internship in agreement with the instructor and the Office of Career Services. The internship should relate to the student's major or minor area of study. Contract is required.

Prerequisite: junior or senior standing


EQS 482 - Equestrian Capstone

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3

Required by all majors, this capstone course will survey advanced professional skills pertinent to the equine industry. Content includes: legal horse transportation through the examination of local, state, and federal regulations for horses, a survey of topics relating to current global industry trends, and professional engagement within the equine community. Students will be required to perform community service as an equine professional, fulfill capstone portfolio assignments, complete major specific exit exams, and perform a juried demonstration specific to their major course of study. Double majors are required to perform a demonstration of their skills in each content area.

Prerequisite: senior standing and permission of instructor


EQS 499 - Independent Study

Semester: Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 1-3

This course allows a superior student to devise and pursue independent study in an area agreed upon in consultation with, and supervised by, a faculty member. Students should be either a major or minor and have a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or greater.

Prerequisite: junior or senior standing


ESC 314 - Range Ecology

Semester: Fall; Alternate years
Semester hours: 4

This course is the study of mixed grass prairies of the West and an introduction to ecological concepts applicable to that area. Topics include historical and current land use, ecosystem responses to change, methods for maintaining natural prairie habitats, the use of prairies as rangelands, and determinations of ecological conditions and trends on rangelands. The laboratory focuses on identification of common prairie plant species and their importance for both wildlife and domestic animals. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory session per week.

Prerequisite: BIO 120 or ESC 223


HHP 161 - Foundations of Human Structure and Function

Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 4

Students examine the basic foundations and functions of the human body, including the skeletal, muscular, nervous, cardiovascular, digestive, and respiratory systems. Laboratory experiences focus on the nomenclature, structure, and function of these systems.


HHP 316 - Motor Development and Learning

Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 4

This course focuses on the factors that influence the learning of motor skills. Content includes features of skill development, processes of perception, and components of action as these relate to the acquisition and teaching of goal-directed movement. Practical application of theory is a central part of the course.


MAT 175 - Calculus I

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 5

This course is a study of the functions of one real variable and includes a brief review of circular functions. The ideas of limit, continuity, and differentiation are explained and applied to physical problems. Topics include the use of approximations and problem solving. The use of graphing calculators is required.

Prerequisite: satisfactory score on a placement exam or MAT 110


MAT 210 - Probability and Statistics

Semester: Fall, Spring, and Summer
Semester hours: 3

This course provides a non-calculus-based study of discrete probability theory and its statistical applications. Distribution theory and its applications in hypothesis testing and setting confidence intervals are discussed.

Prerequisite: MAT 100 or satisfactory score on a placement exam


PHS 101 - Fundamental Physics I

Semester: Fall; Alternate years
Semester hours: 4

Students examine a survey of the laws and phenomena of classical physics, including motion, force, energy, momentum, waves, and thermodynamics. This course is suitable for non-science majors who have a strong background in high school algebra and who wish to have a more rigorous understanding of physics than provided in most courses for non-science majors. The course will satisfy the requirements of geology and biology majors. Students considering graduate work in these areas should take PHS 201 and PHS 202 instead. Three lecture periods and one two-hour laboratory per week.


PHS 102 - Fundamental Physics II

Semester: Spring; Alternate years
Semester hours: 4

Students examine a survey of the laws and phenomena of classical and modern physics, including light, electricity, magnetism, and atomic and nuclear physics. This course is suitable for non-science majors who have a strong background in high school algebra and who wish to have a more rigorous understanding of physics than provided in most courses for non-science majors. This course will satisfy the requirements of geology and biology majors. Students considering graduate work in these areas should take PHS 201 and PHS 202 instead. Three lecture periods and one two-hour laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: PHS 101


PHS 201 - General Physics I

Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 4

This course is a calculus-based introduction to the laws and phenomena of classical physics, including force and motion, energy and momentum, their conservation laws, and their oscillations. This sequence is required for chemistry majors and engineering students and is recommended for mathematics, biology, and geology students. Three lecture periods and one two-hour laboratory per week.

Corequesite: MAT 175


PHS 202 - General Physics II

Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 4

This course is a calculus-based introduction to the laws and phenomena of classical physics, including mechanics, waves, light, electricity, and magnetism. This sequence is required for chemistry majors and engineering students and is recommended for mathematics, biology, and geology students. Three lecture periods and one two-hour laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: PHS 201
Corequesite: MAT 176


  • Scott Neuman, Director of Equestrian Studies, Assistant Professor
  • Amy Neuman, Associate Professor
  • Christi Brown, Associate Professor
  • Hollis Edwards, Associate Professor
  • Megan Mansfield, Instructor